Your local Safer Neighbourhood Team is Dorchester West
Call them at Dorset Police on: 101 or on their team mobile: 07500 816292 or email: dorchester-rural-snt@dorset.pnn.police.uk
Dorchester Police Twitter Page Have you discovered the Dorchester Police Twitter page yet? Why not take a look and follow the team who will give you up to date information. Their Twitter page can be found on https://twitter.com/DorchesterSNT?
Please only use the numbers above for non-emergency calls. If a crime is in progress or life is in danger, please dial 999. For help and advice, to report an incident or if you have been a victim contact Dorset Police on: Telephone: 101 Non-emergency; Email: 101@dorset.pnn.police.uk; Online: www.dorset.police.uk
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Comprehensive help and advice on crime prevention is available at: https://www.dorset.police.uk/help-advice-crime-prevention/
POLICE ADVICE
Action Fraud is the name given to the UK’s national reporting centre for fraud and financially motivated cyber crime. The team is run by the City of London Police, working alongside the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau and Neighbourhood Alerts team. They use information from all fraud and cyber crime cases reported to them to create alerts about new types of crime or those which are increasing in severity. Fraud is when trickery is used to gain a dishonest advantage, which is often financial, over another person. This can have a devastating impact on those affected. Knowledge is the best defence when it comes to fraud. The more you know about the most recent or common techniques fraudsters are using to defraud victims, the less likely you are to fall into the trap. Dorset Police has designed a new webpage that will keep up to date with the latest frauds affecting the county on our website. Action Fraud also sends information about scams and fraud in your area by email, recorded voice and text message. If you believe you have been a victim of fraud or cybercrime, please report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040, or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk.
a village in the Bride Valley Litton Cheney Dorset
LOCAL AMENITIES
Ghost Brokers
Phishing remains the most successful attack vector for cyber criminals targeting individuals and businesses. Cyber criminals love phishing. Unfortunately, this is not a harmless riverbank pursuit. When criminals go phishing, you are the fish and the bait is usually contained in a scam email or text message. The criminal’s goal is to convince you to click on the links within their scam email or text message, or to give away sensitive information (such as bank details). These messages may look like the real thing but are malicious. Once clicked, you may be sent to a dodgy website which could download viruses onto your computer or steal your passwords. As of 30 April 2021, over 5.8 million emails were reported to the Suspicious Email Reporting Service (SERS). The tool, which was launched by the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) and the City of London Police last April, allows the public to forward suspicious emails to an automated system that scans it for malicious links. Since its launch, over 43,000 scams and 84,000 malicious websites have been removed. What are the most common phishing scams? The most commonly spoofed organisation reported in phishing emails was TV Licensing, with victims of these emails reporting losses totalling £5.3m. The majority of losses occurred as a result of victims following malicious links in the emails and inputting their personal information into what they thought was the legitimate TV Licensing website. Shortly after, they would receive a call from criminals impersonating bank staff who was able to convince them that their bank accounts were compromised and persuaded them to transfer all of their money to a new ‘safe’ account. Some of the other most commonly impersonated organisations included HMRC and DVLA. We also received more than 40,000 suspicious email reports relating to COVID-19. How you can protect yourself from phishing messages. Fake emails and text messages can sometimes be difficult to spot and criminals are constantly getting better at finding ways to make them seem more authentic. Email address spoofing, for example, is just one of the tactics criminals will use to try and make their fake emails look real. Here are some tips you should follow to protect yourself, and others, from scam emails and text messages: 1: Be cautious of messages asking for your personal information. Official organisations, such as your bank, should never ask you for personal or financial information via email or text message. If you receive a message and you want to check that it’s legitimate, you can call the organisation directly using a known number, such as the one on a bank statement or utility bill. 2: Report suspicious emails. If you receive an email you’re not quite sure about, you should report it to the Suspicious Email Reporting Service (SERS) by forwarding the email to: report@phishing.gov.uk. Your reports will help government and law enforcement agencies to remove malicious emails and websites. 3: Report suspicious text messages. If you receive a suspicious text message, you can report it by forwarding the message to 7726. It’s free of charge and enables your mobile network provider to investigate the origin of the text and take action, if found to be malicious. 4: Report fraud. If you’ve lost money or provided personal information as a result of a phishing scam, notify your bank immediately and report it to Action Fraud. For more information on how to protect yourself from fraud and cybercrime, please visit: actionfraud.police.uk/cybercrime Thanks for reading! If you found this information useful, please help us spread the word by forwarding this email to your friends.
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Scam Alert
Just 15% of people have heard of a ‘ghost broker’.* Do you know what one is? Have you ever heard of a ‘ghost broker’? No, we are not talking about things that go bump in the night – this is a lot scarier. ‘Ghost brokers’ are fraudsters who sell fake or invalid car insurance policies. Victims are sold fake insurance documents for a policy that does not exist, or for a genuine policy that has been set up using false details to lower the price of the premium. How do ‘ghost brokers’ operate? Fraudsters lure victims in with the offer of cheaper insurance premiums, usually via social media or by word-of-mouth. These individuals or groups pose as middlemen for well-known insurance companies, claiming they can offer you legitimate car insurance at a significantly cheaper price. This ty#pe of fraud is typically carried out either by forging insurance documents, falsifying your details to bring the price down, or by taking out a genuine policy for you but cancelling it soon after. Often, the victim is not aware that they have been scammed until they are involved in an accident and try to claim on the policy. Who do ‘ghost brokers’ target? ‘Ghost brokers’ tend to target vulnerable communities, including members of non-English speaking communities who may not have full knowledge of UK insurance and laws, as well as young people looking for cheaper insurance deals. Last year, Action Fraud received 694 reports of ‘ghost broking’, with almost a third (29%) coming from victims aged 17-29. The reported losses for these victims alone totalled £113,500, with each individual losing an average of £559. Figures also indicate that over half (58%) of all reports in 2020 were submitted by men. What could happen if I drive without valid insurance? As policies sold by ‘ghost brokers’ are either invalid, non-existent or fraudulent, this means that the driver is technically uninsured, meaning that you could face: £300 fixed penalty notice Six points on driving licence Vehicle being seized and crushed How can I protect myself from ‘ghost brokers’? There are simple steps that you can take to spot the signs of these scams and avoid being taking for a ride by ‘ghost brokers’: ‘Ghost brokers’ often advertise and communicate via social media, online forums and messaging apps. If a broker is only using a mobile phone or email as a way of contact, this can be a sign of this type of crime. Fraudsters do not want to be traced after they have taken money from their victims. They may also try to sell insurance policies through print adverts in pubs, clubs or bars, newsagents If a deal seems too good to be true, then it probably is. If you are not sure about the broker, check on the Financial Conduct Authority or the British Insurance Brokers’ Association website for a list of all authorised insurance brokers. You can also contact the insurance company directly to verify the broker’s details. You can also check to see if a car appears to be insured on the Motor Insurance Database website. If you think that you have been a victim of a ghost broker, you can report your concerns to Action Fraud at actionfraud.police.uk or on 0300 123 2040. You can also contact the Insurance Fraud Bureau via its confidential Cheatline on 0800 422 0421 or on the IFB website. *According to a YouGov survey commissioned by the IFB Message Sent By Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)
Crime & Policing Survey
Dorset’s Police and Crime Commissioner David Sidwick is launching a survey to ask residents for their views on crime and policing in the county. Members of the public are being asked to complete the survey and provide information about what is important to them. Go here to complete the survey online. The survey is being launched as the Commissioner prepares his Police and Crime Plan, setting out a new strategic direction for Dorset Police and the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner over the next three years. Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner David Sidwick said: “This is your chance to tell me and Dorset Police what you want us to prioritise over the next few years. It will look at priorities derived from three years of campaigning and talking to the people of Dorset, which will form the basis for the plan, and now we need to check what you think about them – do you agree with them and do they align with your own values?” Feedback from the survey will help shape the Police and Crime Plan, which will be in place by the autumn. People completing the survey will be shown six different priority areas – from cutting crime and anti-social behaviour to making sure every penny counts – and asked to rate how important they think each one is. The survey will also ask respondents whether they think the Commissioner’s overarching goal of making Dorset the safest county in England and Wales is a suitable ambition. He said: “Remember, this plan is your plan. It sets the agenda for what the Force, as well as my own office, will focus on over the next three years. Therefore, it’s crucial that we get your thoughts and opinions to make sure local policing remains dynamic and responsive to the communities it serves. So please, take a moment to complete this survey. It takes just a couple of minutes to complete but the views we get will make a real difference.” Message Sent By PCC Communications (Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, Communications and Engagement, Dorset).