Your local Safer Neighbourhood Team is Dorchester West
Call them at Dorset Police on: 101 or on their team mobile: 07500 816292 or email: dorchester-rural-snt@dorset.pnn.police.uk
Please only use the numbers above for non-emergency calls. If a crime is in progress or life is in danger, please dial 999
Dorchester Police Twitter Page Have you discovered the Dorchester Police Twitter page yet? Why not take a look and follow the team who will give you up to date information. Their Twitter page can be found on https://twitter.com/DorchesterSNT?
If you are going away please remember to: Cancel milk, newspapers and other deliveries. If possible, give a spare key to a family member or neighbour and ask them to pick up your post, so that it is not lying in a pile on the floor. If you have an external mail-box, ask someone to regularly empty it for you. Don't close curtains or blinds, as they are a 'give away' that the house is not occupied, particularly when drawn through the day Consider plugging a lamp into a 'time-switch', which will automatically turn the lamp on and off during the evening. However, don't put the lamp in a room, which passers-by can see into when the light is on. You could also use a 'time- switch' to automatically switch on a radio Keep spare keys in a safe place. The first places that a burglar will look are under a mat or flowerpots. If possible, leave spare keys with a family member or friend/neighbour, rather than outside your property. Never leave keys in the locks inside or lying around the house Lock all ladders and garden tools away in your shed or garage. Put a strong lock on the garden shed and lock all garage doors Please don't let the whole Social Networking world know that you're away. You never know who might be reading your messages. Finally, go away and have a great holiday! Remember that many of the above guidelines can also be used when going out for the evening.
Meet the Team Meet the team and members of your PACT Panel to raise local issues at the following events. Surgeries: 1st Tuesday of every month, 10.30 - 11.00am Charminster Village Shop 2nd Tuesday of every month, 11.00 - 11.30am Abbots Coffee Shop, Cerne Abbas 3rd Thursday of every month, 10.30 - 11.00am Village Shop, Cattistock Last Tuesday of every month, 2.30 - 3.00pm Maiden Newton, Amber Hardware, Dorchester Road 2nd Wednesday of every month, 2.00 - 2.30pm Post Office, Martinstown  Every Thursday at 10.30am Meet The Team at Dorchester Library
Please only use the numbers above for non-emergency calls. If a crime is in progress or life is in danger, please dial 999. For help and advice, to report an incident or if you have been a victim contact Dorset Police on: Telephone: 101 Non-emergency; Email: 101@dorset.pnn.police.uk; Online: www.dorset.police.uk
POLICE ADVICE
CRIME PREVENTION
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Dorset Litton Cheney in the Bride Valley
Your Safer Neighbourhood Police Officers are:-
Inspector Mike Darby PCSO Sarah Pilcher PCSO Daniel Gent PC Pete Moore PCsGed Want
Comprehensive help and advice on crime prevention is available at: https://www.dorset.police.uk/help-advice-crime-prevention/
For further information, help and advice on crime prevention visit:  https://www.dorset.police.uk/help-advice-crime-prevention/
Message sent by Amy Crowfoot (Dorset Police, Communications and Engagement Department, Force HQ) Dorset Police receives, on average, 1300 non-emergency calls every day. With the high volume of daily calls the non- emergency 101 line receives, there will inevitably be occasions where callers are subject to a delay with their enquiry. To help tackle these delays, after the initial contact where the call is prioritised by the call handler, callers are given the option to leave a message, request a call back or send the Force an email at enquiries@dorset.pnn.police.uk. Each of these options generates a quick response as calls and emails are closely monitored by officers in the Force Command Centre (FCC) which means that the public do not have to wait on the line. With such a high demand it is important that the public only call the 101 non-emergency line for a matter that requires a non- urgent police response. These will include, but are not limited to: Your car or motorcycle has been stolen Your property has been damaged You want to give information about crime in your area Examples of matters that will require a response from other authorities such as the local council and not the police are: Dog fouling Abandoned or badly parked vehicles Dumping or fly tipping As with every public service line, the 101 line is subject to misdirected, unnecessary or even nuisance calls. During this month alone, the following are real examples of calls the police have received: A caller found a basket of kittens and a mother cat and wanted to know what to do A caller reported they had dropped their phone out of the car window Callers have asked for: A taxi Opening times of the bank The phone number for Bournemouth Crown Court Cones for moving house School administration Superintendent Caroline Naughton, Head of Contact Management, said: “There are three key messages to the public. Firstly, policing is complex and therefore some calls will take longer to deal with, such as the reporting of crimes as we need to ensure all details are correct, provide support to the victim and ensure safeguarding is in place. Calls of this nature may take over 30 minutes to deal with and therefore the availability of call handers to answer calls is reduced. Secondly, if the matter isn’t urgent then please leave a message or email us on enquiries@dorset.pnn.police.uk. We have dedicated staff managing emails and responding to voicemails and we will reply to you promptly. Finally, it is very important that the public use the 101 service appropriately. We continue to receive inappropriate calls which put more demand on our system and potentially reduce availability of call handlers. Remember, if your call is an emergency, i.e. a threat to life, or if a crime is in progress, always call 999. For all non- emergency calls that require a police response, call 101 and if your call isn’t urgent, you can leave a message or use our email address enquiries@dorset.pnn.police.uk and we will respond to you as soon as we are able to.
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USE OF 101 NON-EMERGENCY LINE
Action Fraud is the name given to the UK’s national reporting centre for fraud and financially motivated cyber crime. The team is run by the City of London Police, working alongside the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau and Neighbourhood Alerts team. They use information from all  fraud and cyber crime cases reported to them to create alerts about new types of crime or those which are increasing in severity.
Fraud is when trickery is used to gain a dishonest advantage, which is often financial, over another person. This can have a devastating impact on those affected.  Knowledge is the best defence when it comes to fraud. The more you know about the most recent or common techniques fraudsters are using to defraud victims, the less likely you are to fall into the trap.  Dorset Police has designed a new webpage that will keep up to date with the latest frauds affecting the county on our website. Action Fraud also sends information about scams and fraud in your area by email, recorded voice and text message. If you believe you have been a victim of fraud or cybercrime, please report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040, or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk.
SCAM ALERT
Message sent by: Mark Jones (Dorset Police, PCSO 6269, Sherborne Rural) A Sherborne resident was contacted by a person purporting to be their internet provider and engaged the resident on the phone for several hours. The caller told the victim that their computer was infected with California Ransom-ware and told them to download software onto their computer, which they did. The same caller then rang the victim a second time saying they were going to set up new passwords for them with their assistance. The caller then obtained the victim’s bank passwords and removed several thousand pounds from their bank account. Fraudsters often use the names of well-known companies to commit their crime, as it makes their communication with you seem more legitimate. This is why it’s important to think twice before giving out any personal information. Computer firms do not make unsolicited phone calls to help you fix your computer. Fraudsters make these phone calls to try to steal from you and damage your computer with malware. Treat all unsolicited phone calls with scepticism and don’t give out any personal information. Further information on all current and known scams is available at the Action Fraud website. PCSO 6269 Jones http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/
FAKE JOB ADVERTS
The National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB) and Action Fraud have recently noticed that Fraudsters have been setting up fake adverts on social media (including Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp) and job browsing websites to dupe people into believing they are recruiting for prospective models. Once victims show interest in the job, the fraudsters contact potential victims on the false promise of a modelling career and subsequently advise the victims to come in for a test shoot. The fraud can then potentially be carried out in two ways; Firstly, the fraudsters can pressurise the victims in sending an upfront fee to book a slot for the test shoot. Once they have received the upfront fee, the victim will never hear from the fraudsters again. The second possible method is that the fraudsters will take the advance fee that the victim sends for a photo shoot and arrange a photo shoot with the victim. After the photo shoot, the fraudsters will contact the victim after a few days and convince them that their shoot was successful and offer them a job as a model. The victim will then be asked to sign a contract and pay another upfront fee, usually to secure the modelling contract. Fraudsters are also creating fake adverts for supposed modelling opportunities for children which do not exist. Fraudsters will inform parents or guardians that a potential career in modelling awaits their child. This tactic convinces the parent or guardian to sign up their child and send an advance fee. The suspects will also convince the victim that in order to become a model, they will need to have a portfolio. The fraudsters will recommend a number of packages and stress that if a package is not paid for in advance, the process of becoming a model cannot continue. Over a two year period (September 2015 – August 2017), an average of 28 reports of advance fee modelling frauds have been received per month by the NFIB. In August 2017, 49 Action Fraud reports of this fraud type were received and may continue to rise. The total loss in August 2017 alone was over £71,000. Tips for staying safe:  Carry out your own research prior to paying any type of advance or upfront fee.  Be wary if you are asked to pay for a portfolio, as many legitimate agencies will cover that cost.  Don't give your bank account details or sensitive information to anyone without carrying out your own research on the relevant agency.  If you have been affected by this, or any other type of fraud, report it to Action Fraud by visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk or by calling 0300 123 2040.
· · · · Crime Prevention Use of 101 Emergency Line Action Fraud Scam Alert Fake Job Adverts